Where does all the wood and chip go?

If you’re like most people, you probably don’t think about where the wood and chips go. We will discuss where all that wood and chip go and how they are used.

Tree work produces chippings and wood.

As part of the original quote for your tree work, removal of all brash, branches and wood is standard. You just left with a low stump. The chip and wood are carted away on a tipper van and taken to one of several tip sites that deal in waste wood only. We have a waste carriers licence for transporting waste wood.

Official tip sites collect the wood and chip in great quantities and then call in an articulated lorry to collect the wood. One such company is A.W. Jenkinson they are the market leader in this area of tree work. Check them out here.

https://www.awjenkinson.co.uk/

Tip sites how does that work?

I will give an example of one tip site. Cheshire Green waste is one where we use it. Cheshire Green Waste is very organised and has plenty of space in its yard. There is a designated place for green chips, white chips, logs and a huge brash pile.

What is a green and white chip?

The colour of chip denotes the amount of leaf in the chip, so conifers are green chips as can be deciduous when they are in full leaf. white chip is either very low leaf content or none, which is a better product for a clean hot burn. Check them out here.

What happens next?

The lorries transport the waste wood to one of two power stations that exclusively burn waste wood only. If you have had your tree work done by a reputable tree surgeon in a few weeks you can think we have contributed something to our light bulbs being on this evening. As tree surgeons, we make no financial gain from this just the tip sites.

What about carbon?

Unlike very old coal, most wood we deal with is only 30-40 years old. In the grand scheme, I regard it as carbon neutral. Permit me to explain how. Carbon was captured from the atmosphere in the growth of the tree and remained there for 30-40 years and so is released again. In historic terms, this is a very short cycle which is why in comparison to fossil fuels it is really carbon neutral.